Terms and Definitions

This page is currently under construction - please bear with us as we continue to update our Terms and Definitions


  1. Apprenticeship Programs
  2. Basic Skills Assessment
  3. Bridging Programs
  4. Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)
  5. Credential assessment
  6. Education Qualification Assessment
  7. English as a Second Language (ESL)
  8. Enhanced Language Training (ELT)
  9. General Computer Training
  10. IELTS
  11. Internship Programs
  12. Job Coaching
  13. Job Fairs
  14. Job Retention Services
  15. Job Search Workshops (JSW)
  16. Language Instruction for Newcomers (LINC)
  17. Language Training
  18. Licensing
  19. Mentoring
  20. Networking
  21. Occupation Specific Computer Training
  22. Occupation Specific Language Training
  23. Occupation Specific Technical Training
  24. Prior Learning Assessment and Rec (PLAR)
  25. Professional Accreditation
  26. Professional Degree/Diploma
  27. TOEFL
  28. Vocational Assessment
  29. Vocational Training
  30. Volunteering Programs
  31. Workplace Communication

 

  1. Apprenticeship Programs

Apprenticeship refers to method in which a trainee learns a craft or trade by hands-on experience while working with a recognized master craftsperson in that field, usually under a written or implied formal agreement.   

[Back to Top]

2.  Basic Skills Assessment

Basic skills refers to literacy, numeracy and basic computer skills needed in order to find any type of employment.

[Back to Top]

3. Bridging Programs

Each bridging program is unique, but in general they are designed to give internationally trained individuals: an assessment of their education and skills, clinical or workplace experience, skills training or targeted academic training, preparation for license or certification examination, occupation-related language training and individual learning plans to identify any added training needed.

[Back to Top]

4.  Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)

Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) – CLB is the nationally recognized standard for assessing the English language proficiency of adults. Most of the employment related trainings and workshops offered to newcomers require a CLB assessment. The assessment is considered as one of the first steps a newcomer should consider after his/her arrival in Canada. 
A newcomer might require to get a CLB assessment to participate in the following programs:

a. Job Search Workshop (JSW) 

b. Enhanced Language Training (ELT)

c. Occupation Specific Language Training (OSLT) 

d. English as a Second Language (ESL) training 

e. Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) 

f. Bridging programs 

g. Other occupation specific programs and trainings 

For more information you can visit: http://www.language.ca/

[Back to Top]

 

5. Credential Assessment

Credential assessments include an assessment of your education, work experience and/or professional credentials received outside of Canada.  Depending on your reason for obtaining as assessment (ie: to apply for college or university, for employment or for immigration purposes) you may need a specific type of assessment, performed by a designated company/organization. Universities and Colleges will only accept certain types of assessments. Be sure to inquire before you have your credentials assessed.

[Back to Top]

6.  Education Qualification Assessment

This assessment is used to verify that your foreign degree, diploma, certificate (or other proof of your credential) is valid and to determine its equivalency compared to a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate.

[Back to Top]

7. English as a Second Language (ESL)

ESL is a language program for students whose primary language is not English and would require additional English language support to develop reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. In Toronto, ESL programs are free for newcomers and are offered through many community agencies, the Toronto District School Board and the Toronto Catholic District School Board.

[Back to Top]

8. Enhanced Language Training (ELT)

ELT programs provide job-specific, advanced-level English training to adult newcomers. The goal of ELT is to provide language training that helps you find and keep jobs that match your skills and qualifications. ELT programs are especially useful for Internationally Educated Professionals (IEP)and tradespeople. Generally, ELT programs are equivalent to Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) levels 7-10. Many ELT programs also have bridge-to-work assistance, including mentorship, work placements and other employment help. 

[Back to Top]

9. General Computer Training

General Computer Training includes basic computer skills for those who have limited experience.  Most general programs include MicroSoft Office (Word, Excel) as well as basic training in internet and email use.

[Back to Top]

10. IELTS

In Canada, IELTS is used as a measure of English language proficiency for citizenship, Permanent Residence applications, immigration, skilled worker applications, university entrance requirements, Masters degree programs, and other professional designations. The goal of the JSW Program is to equip you with the knowledge and skills to better understand the strategies, business perspective and next steps of your job search process through individualized job search coaching, practice sessions and professional networking events.

[Back to Top]

11. Internship Programs

An internship is a temporary position with an emphasis on on-the-job training rather than merely employment, and it can be paid or unpaid.  Some professions require that an internship is completed before being qualified to work in the field ie: doctor, lawyer.

[Back to Top]

12. Job Coaching

Job coaching refers to the training of an employee by an approved specialist, who uses structured intervention techniques to help the employee learn to perform job tasks to the employer's specifications and to learn the interpersonal skills necessary to be accepted as a worker at the job site,

[Back to Top]

13. Job Fairs

A job fair, also referred commonly as a career fair or career expo, is a fair or exposition for employers, recruiters, and schools to meet with prospective job seekers. Job Fairs commonly include on-the-spot job interviews as well as workshops on resume writing, interview skills and job search techniques.  Job Fairs provide an opportunity to meet several employers in a more informal setting.

[Back to Top]

14. Job Retention Services

Services for people who are employed but may need some support /skills upgrading for their specific job. Sometimes required by the employer, job retention services may include technical skills upgrading, interpersonal communication support or workplace culture information. 

[Back to Top]

15. Job Search Workshops (JSW)

The JSW Program is your first step to employment and it has been specifically designed to assist new and recent immigrants to Canada in their job search. The program offers pre-employment training and assists internationally trained individuals with the initial stages of their job search.

[Back to Top]

16. Language Instruction for Newcomers (LINC)

LINC is a free language training program for eligible adult learners. The LINC program is funded by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. You do not have to pay to for LINC classes. LINC provides basic language skills.

[Back to Top]

17. Language Training

Language Training refers to a variety of training programs and services that teach language skills.  The programs range from basic literacy training and academic upgrading to occupation-specific and technical language programs. 

[Back to Top]

18. Licensing

Formal permission from a governmental or other constituted authority to practice a profession or carry on some business.  The license is usually in the form of certificate, tag, plate, etc., giving proof of such permission; official permit: LIcensing refers to the process of receiving a license.

 

 

19. Mentoring

Mentoring is a supportive learning relationship between a caring individual who shares knowledge, experience and wisdom with another individual who is ready and willing to benefit from this exchange, to enrich their professional journey.

[Back to Top]

20. Networking

Networking is defined as the act of making contact and exchanging information with other people, groups and institutions to develop mutually beneficial relationships, or to access and share information usually as it relates to a profession or career.

[Back to Top]

21. Occupation Specific Computer Training

Computer training courses that specialize in teaching software particular to a profession. For example AutoCad for Engineers or Illustrator for Graphic Designers  These courses are for professionals who wish to learn or upgrade their software skills.

[Back to Top]

22. Occupation Specific Language Training

Job-Specific language training (at a CLB5/6-8 level) for adult newcomers offered through Community agencies and Colleges Ontario.

[Back to Top]

23. Occupation Specific Technical Training


[Back to Top]

24. Prior Learning Assessment and Rec. (PLAR)

PLAR is a type of assessment that is used to evaluate skills and knowledge that we learn outside of a formal learning environment. It is one of three types of assessment that post-secondary institutions use to recognize prior learning.

[Back to Top]

25. Professional Accreditation

Professional Accreditations are given by a regulatory body in certain professions or trades.  The accreditation indicates that a person is licensed to practice that profession.

[Back to Top]

26. Professional Degree/Diploma


[Back to Top]

27. TOEFL

Test of English as a Foreign Language or TOEFL (/ˈtoʊfəl/, TOH-fəl) is a standardized test of English language proficiency for non-native English language speakers wishing to enroll in universities. The test is accepted by many English-speaking academic and professional institutions.

[Back to Top]

28. Vocational Assessment


[Back to Top]

29. Vocational Training


[Back to Top]

30. Volunteering Programs


[Back to Top]

31. Workplace Communication

Effective workplace communication is based on interpersonal, professional relationships that are developed through a keen awareness of courtesy, attentive listening, active participation and situation appropriate body language. The most common workplace communication barriers are non-attentive listening, interrupting others, inappropriate reaction, jumping to conclusions, failure to recognize body language synchronicity and gender differences. To be more effective in your workplace communication, you must be conscious of how you are presenting yourself. For instance, body language synchronicity means having your actions match your words and tone. In addition, recognizing and accepting that women and men communicate differently; women gesticulate more to demonstrate what they are saying and use more words then men when communicating.

[Back to Top]